Linux Software Map: MAT


  • Version: 0.20
  • Entered-date: 1999-11-20
  • Description: MAT is a distributed monitoring and management tool for Linux, SunOS, Solaris, IRIX and HPUX machines. The tool provides an easy to use GUI interface from which the sysadmin, or designated user can administer many of the common UNIX configuration files, as well as backup and replicate/mirror files. New to this release is the replication/mirroring tool.
  • delete:urrent release of the tool can add modify and delete: Users, Hosts, Groups, Mounts, Motd, DNS client config, Services, Aliases, Cron jobs, Syslog config, NFS exports, DNS records, and NIS maps.
  • inspect: Monitoring functions allow you to inspect: Syslog files, Routing tables, disk space, exports and processes, lastlog, routing, nic info etc MATd is a GUI configurable system monitoring daemon.
  • monitor: It currently can monitor: Disk use, Network connectivity, CPU use, Run-queue, Logins, SMTP daemons, FTP servers and Required processes, memory and swap. Several of the monitored parameters are displayed in graphs. MATd can also run user provided scripts if a threshold is exceeded. A house-keeping task periodically trims MATd log files.
  • include:or the key features include: - Can replicate files across many machines - Can backup across the network to a single tape server - Can control many hosts from a single console. - The ability to deligate responsibility to others. - Monitor several system parameters for trend analysis. - DNS, and NIS servers are easliy managed.
  • release:is release: - File/Directory replication / mirroring. - HPUX port - GNU libc build 1596kB mat-0.20.tar.gz 2347 mat.lsm
  • Keywords: Distributed Systems Management Monitoring Administration
  • Author: sblack@ee.ryerson.ca Mark Black
  • Maintained-by: sblack@ee.ryerson.ca Mark Black
  • ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/system/admin/frontends
  • Platforms: Linux, SunOS, Solaris, IRIX, and HPUX
  • Copying-policy: Freeware/Shareware see the License file
Note: Not all entries contain correct, complete filenames or URLs. FTP sites often refuse connections due to excessive traffic. If you have difficulty with the provided links to individual files, try the first link, which is usually to a directory or web site for the program as a whole.
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